Tagged: accessory

An Update on PDP’s Universal Remote for PlayStation 4

I immediately picked up PDP’s PlayStation 4 Media Remote when it was released back at the end of October. It had some unique issues, one of which blocked me from reprogramming one of the devices after I’d set it incorrectly. I contacted PDP to see if there was a way to factory reset it and they surprised me with the offer of a replacement.

It finally arrived last week and I’m happy to say the updated firmware fixed one of my two major complaints. The “volume punch through” which allows the remote to control the volume of a specified device — in my case, the soundbar — is now functional. My biggest complaint, however, is that the thing shuts off its Bluetooth connection after about 20 minutes and requires several seconds to wake up. It’s fine for flitting through YouTube clips but for a movie it means waiting around in order to pause. That just seems wrong.

Overall, though, it’s still the best offering for PlayStation 4 outside of Logitech’s expensive Harmony line. Take a look above to see the new remote in action.

PS4 Owner Jealous of the Xbox Elite Controller? Not Anymore!!!

 

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If Sony won’t step up their support of Pro Gamers to match Microsoft’s recently announced Xbox Elite Controller, then Japanese accessory manufacturer, Game Tech, will. Out now in Japan are the ‘FPS Stick Assist 4+’ and ‘FPS Target Assist 4’ for $10 each. Check the links on those for plenty of close up pictures.

The Stick Assist comes with three new analog stick caps that raise the height in varying degrees with various surface coverings. It also has a pair of L2/R2 caps that give the dainty triggers a little more weight and a rubberized grip. The Target Assist takes an ingeniously low-tech approach to the Xbox controller’s programmable stick sensitivity… it’s foam rings. You put these rings (one hard, one soft) around each analog stick and — voilà  — you’ve got a kinda-sorta sensitivity boost to your movement. If both bundles sound like they’d give you a performance enhancing boost you can seek out the ‘FPS Perfect Assist 4’ which includes the stick caps, trigger grips and foam rings for around $20.

It’s an interesting response to Microsoft’s high end controller but, man, those foam rings surely have to wear out super fast right? The stick caps and grippy triggers, that I can get into.

One Crazy thing the Xbox One Media Remote just won’t do

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Just a quick update today for anyone still interested or on-the-fence over the Xbox One Media Remote. STARTLING DISCOVERY! The remote works fine in every non-game app I’ve used except… for YouTube. Grrrr! The one app that probably gets the most use is the only one I’ve found that’s unsupported. Hopefully it gets an update soon-ish but given Google and Microsoft’s animosity towards one another lately it could be a while.

On the upside, that’s the only major shortcoming of the remote I’ve found after two weeks of use. Netflix, Twitch, TED, the entire dashboard, the store interfaces, Xbox Music/Videos, Crackle, Skype; all work great with the tiny remote. I do wish there were an easier way to snap and unsnap things without dumping back to the dashboard or yelling at Kinect. If it just had room for one. More. Button.

 

The Xbox One Media Remote: Go Buy One

We were out and about this past weekend and stopped in at Best Buy for the first time in what feels like years. Amidst their disheveled Xbox One display was this tiny green box with a little black bar in the middle. As I got closer I realized it was the Media Remote which was due out… some day in March. I had already forgotten about the thing but instantly grabbed one despite its $25 price tag. You can watch the video above to see it in action but if you’re looking for a quick breakdown here’s some pros and cons:

PROS

  • Has that smooth, soft rubber feel all over
  • Totally silent compared to using the clicky controller
  • Motion sensor lights up the keys as you pick it up
  • Dedicated One Guide button to go right to TV grid
  • More responsive IR than older 360 remote
  • Playback control buttons work in apps as well as with discs

CONS

  • $25, really?
  • A little too small in my hand
  • Low profile buttons hard to tell apart at times
  • Wibbly-wobbly design, if that kind of thing bothers you
  • Has to be pointed at Kinect to adjust volume
  • Didn’t work in Xbox Fitness app which seems weird