Tagged: Achievements

Achieving: 200 Miles followed quickly by a Satisfying Death

I’d been working my way towards Mile 200 in The Flame in the Flood since January but after a hospital visit, weeks of feeling terrible and then a Disney vacation I didn’t get to finish it off until just this past weekend. There are 6 parts in total if you want to watch a longer leg of the journey but it really wraps up nicely in the final episode above.

After hitting the 200th Mile *DING* I decided to end my run as spectacularly as possible by dying from 10 simultaneous afflictions… amid a bear attack *DING*. Then I remembered that there’s a Director’s Commentary mode so I started a new game, listened to some early dev talk and managed one last Trophy for staying on the river for 10 miles without stopping *DING*.

Achieving: Tales of Pointless Self Reward retold in brief posts whenever we feel like it.

Achieving: Stealthy Steampunk Satisfaction in The Swindle

Achieving: Stealthy Steampunk Satisfaction in The Swindle

I started out not thinking The Swindle was very good. It wants to combine Spelunky with Mark of the Ninja into a roguelike stealth/action game but the finicky controls keep it from feeling as solid and reliable as its predecessors. Nevertheless, it’s got style, an amazing soundtrack and some clever gadgets tucked up its sleeves.

Completing the game in 100 days feels as much like an accounting class as it does a heist. You need to raise over £500,000 to access all the districts leading up to Scotland Yard where the game’s McGuffin is stashed. You’ll never do it by farming the starting area in the slums so you initially have to be choosy about which of the 30+ upgrades you buy. One of them is a teleporter that lets you zip through solid walls, obviously decreasing the difficulty, and the other is a computer you can use to extend the 100-day deadline (for an exponential fee).

I managed to rely on neither of them and was still well prepared for the major swindle… until I boned it up. In the final stretch I slid off of a wall directly in front of the last guard who stood between me and the goal. I’ll take the blame on that one after a nerve wracking hour spent infiltrating the place, but that mechanic has dropped me into trouble numerous times before. See, it’s finicky.

Second attempt and it’s getting a little later than I wanted to be up playing. Once again I gingerly explore the randomly generated tower which, this time, is filled with sound detecting bots that launch out a flurry of thief-seeking, one-shot drones. Super. After even more time with this tower I’ve finally quelled the opposition in total silence and set up a path to run straight out in case something tricky happens after I grab the goods (which I’d never done up to this point). After the requisite pause for effect, I grabbed it and ran on my pre-planned path, completely uneventfully to the finale of the game. That there. That felt good.

The A-rank I was given only made me feel better so I reloaded my save and set off for another Trophy: to Ghost a bank while killing every enemy. It was essentially what I’d just pulled off on the final mission only with slightly less opposition so I had it done in about 25 more minutes. Icing on the cake for the evening, and another Ultra Rare, less-than-1%-completion Trophy was scored.

Achieving: Tales of Pointless Self Reward retold in brief posts whenever we feel like it.

Achieving: Double (Weekend) Happiness

achieving-doublehapiness

It was a weekend of Trophy pop-ups for some very long-in-the-works accomplishments! I’ve had Guitar Hero Live since Christmas and I’d been playing it in fits and starts until the recent news about the development studio’s downsizing and restructuring. The best part of the game is it’s always-on, 24/7 streaming video channels which, naturally, will be the first money-sucking part of the game to get the axe sooner or later.

Of course there’s a progression system to the thing and Trophies tied to milestones like reaching the max level, strumming 1,000,000 times and playing for 24 hours. On Sunday I somehow managed to score 50 million cumulative points within an hour of hitting the level cap. Reaching Level 20 was all I was really after before the game gets shut down and with that scratched off the list I can focus on that one million strums thing. Man, that’s nuts.

As you are no doubt painfully aware, Spelunker World is the other game I’ve been playing for ages. Between the Japanese and US versions I’ve officially been at it for over a year as of early April and I finally — fiiiinally — accomplished two goals as old as time itself. I’ve now completed every one of the game’s 100 nightmarishly deadly levels on my own. There were a few continues used on some of the really fiendish and drawn out ones but I didn’t even blow that many Moon Stones getting through it all.

Though the benefit of teaming up in Spelunker World is immense I still stick to offline play most of the time, that’s why it’s taken this long to get ranked MVP 100 times. MVP comes from a combination of things: most points, having picked up the most keys or litho-stones and rescuing more dead players than everyone else. With more and more players topping Level 100 it’s getting harder to get MVP rank but, just like Guitar Hero, I managed it in the same weekend as finishing off the main levels.

Achieving: Tales of Pointless Self Reward in Games retold in brief posts whenever we feel like it.

Achieving: Platinum, finally

Can you believe it’s been nearly two and a half years since I posted about a dumb achievement? The proverbial itch has apparently been scratched. Over the last console generation I played most everything on Xbox 360 and the PlayStation 3 exclusives I did dive into weren’t usually the ones to get Platinum trophies. So here I am in 2015 all proud that I basically just played a ton of Rocket League.

You’ll hit most of the trophies in the game just by playing it for a while. The unlocks come at the end of almost every five-minute match. Blasting around after the ball you’ll inevitably hit one in while driving backwards as well as bump an opponent into the ball for a goal. Many of them you can unlock just by setting up bot matches. But the ones that took the longest were finally playing online with a friend (aww, how sad) and racking up 50km on a single set of decorative tires. It finally popped though, in the middle of an uneventful match, and now I have a Platinum trophy and Yay and whatever. Let’s go play some more Rocket League already!

Achieving: Tales of Pointless Self Reward in Games retold in brief posts whenever we feel like it.

My first 200 hours in Grand Theft Auto V (Part 2: Online)

gtavonline1

As obsessed as I was about seeing as much of the single player content as possible, I had no idea how possessed I would get once Grand Theft Auto Online rolled out. I stuck with it after the shaky launch and found a different kind of San Andreas than the world Trevor, Michael and Franklin inhabit. I’m a no-good thug, fresh off the plane and in town to meet my LifeInvader pal, Lamar. He basically hands me a gun and throws open the gates to the world; a confusing new place where I’m a criminal jack-of-all-trades.

Like the fervor around the launch of Portal and Fez part of the fun has been figuring out how this peculiar MMOGTA works. Rockstar filled the game with grinding, loot and quest givers like any other MMO but they wrote a bunch of their own rules and didn’t bother explaining them all. Passive mode makes you immune to player abuse, unless you get in a car. The world is full of ATMs that you can stash your cash in but you can also use your phone for convenient online banking. Races and respawns cost money. Your apartment comes with daily utility fees. I’ve posted a few times as I’ve discovered how it all works and now that I’ve gotten farther in things are really getting crazy.

gtavonline2

At any time the open world around you is crawling with distractions. If it’s not driving to a clothing store to see what your last level-up unlocked it’s an impromptu gang attack, an armored truck packed with money, a convenience store yet to be robbed or a random player to greet/grief. All of that sits alongside starting points for nearly 100 races, 72 deathmatches, 6 Horde style survival games, parachuting and team deathmatches.

What you could call story missions pop up frequently from your cellphone contacts and work much like regular GTA missions only you can invite your friends. These linger on the “drive here, kill these guys, drive back” formula for quite a while but soon it gets interesting. Stealing tankers as they barrell across the highway is much easier with multiple gunmen. Bringing a helicopter full of gun-toting friends to bear on a sky-high construction site is much more exciting than attempting it alone. The most elaborate mission I’ve been a part of so far eclipses even the single player stuff with multiple gunfights, invasions and even hacking.

All of this has been even more all-consuming since we decided to buy a second copy of the game. Finding a game with an interesting online mode that Katy and I are both interested in at the same time hardly ever happens. GTA Online has paid for itself a million times over in ridiculous knife fights, accidental explosions, frantic Survival rounds, racing shenanigans, and bluntly honest fashion advice. Joined by a regular, nightly crew of friends I’ve finally found that unrelentingly fun multiplayer experience that so many have had this console generation.