Category: Culture

Posts not about a game itself but something that gaming has inspired. Art, mods, tributes, that kinda stuff.

E3 2001: Sega B-Roll & Nintendo Booth Tour 📺 From The Collection TV


For the month of June, It Came From The Collection and ICFTC -TV- are going back in time to E3 2000 and 2001! Some of this has been shared on GameLuv in the past but it’s here again with new trimmings and higher resolution video.

Pull up to one of the numerous screens as Sega’s booth that was endlessly looping clips and footage of Toejam & Earl 3, Sega Bass Fishing, Sonic Advance, Gunvalkyrie, Super Monkeyball, Virtua Fighter, and many other multi-platform titles. Then head over to Nintendo’s booth for a panoramic view of the giant screen and DJ stage, the interactive Wario puppet, huge spinning GameCube logos, and a mesmerizing wall of blue waves.

📺 About the Show 📺
It Came From The Collection -TV- is a supplemental series to my hands-on videos. These clips, commercials, and programs go live every Saturday morning to recapture the spirit of the legendary cartoon lineups and laser-focused marketing aimed at young minds. I’ve tried to clean up the picture and sound, and render them at 1080p for a more viewable presentation. ICFTC -TV- ! Part of a nutritious breakfast!

It’s Free! on the PlayStation Store for June 20th + “Wow, That’s A Game!?”

It’s Free! on the PlayStation Store for June 20th + "Wow, That's A Game!?"

Now that E3 is over we can get back to the flood of exciting and free new releases… ohoh no, this is… this is a downright drought! For the week of June 20th we’ve only got two free offerings: Yang Xiao Long joins the roster of BlazBlue Cross Tag Battle while Bimboosoft offers a free Avatar icon from Dream Match Tennis VR which they describe only as “the tennis ball”.

It’s such a slim week that I want to fill out this post with a feature I like to call WOW, That’s A Game!?. In looking at the PlayStation Store every week I’ve started noting some of the more dubious entries on the platform that I’ll point out during slow weeks like this. Fair warning, these aren’t necessarily free things!

BRIKS 2 comes from Smobile, makers of some of the PlayStation’s most generic, lightly animated and titillating Home Screen themes. In BRIKS 2 you can play a game of Breakout on top of those same lightly animated wallpapers and yes, you read right, this is the sequel. From what I can tell BRIKS 2 doesn’t actually change much over the original but both remain on sale for $14 and $16 respectively.

That’s an egregious price for what looks like a pretty simple offering given that most of the art already exists and is even sold separately on the PlayStation Store. Nevertheless, I respect Smobile’s resourcefulness, turning one product into another. It also gives me vibes of the arcade game Fantasia 2, the sensationally NSFW knock-off of Qix that I have a strange, earnestly non-sexual fondness for.

It Came From The Collection 11: E3 2001 Trinkets, Postcards & More

 

EPISODE 11: E3 2001 Trinkets, Postcards & More
Let’s look at some trinkets, business cards, stickers, and even postcards from E3 2001. It was a bygone age when you’d get spam in your literal, physical mailbox to come see hot new games on the show floor!

GameCube paper promo with CD-ROM trailer disc
Sonic Adventure 2 “Unleashed” card

“COME SEE US AT E3” POSTCARDS:
ANNO 1503
Nintendo Blast Radius
Millie Meter Tivola CD-ROM
Midway Games
Worms: Global Worming + Stickers

E3 Media kit CD-ROM
FunCom’s amazing business card
Infogrames business card
NetGames Multiplayer SDK mini CD
Ubisoft Roadrage GBA holo sticker
Mat Hoffman’s Pro BMX 2 sticker
Netbaby card
Soulcalibur trading card pack!
Xbox promo cards for Johnny Drama (canceled game)!

✨ About the Show 
In hopes of bringing something a little more unique to YouTube I started ‘It Came From The Collection‘ to chronicle the gaming ephemera I’ve amassed over the years: flyers and pamphlets, pre-order tchotchkes, toys, posters, and all kinds of marketing paperwork. Follow the series on my channel and check out more of my collection on Instagram.

E3 2001: Rubu Tribe Hands-on (Canceled Game) 📺 From The Collection TV


For the month of June, It Came From The Collection and ICFTC -TV- are going back in time to E3 2000 and 2001! Some of this has been shared on GameLuv in the past but it’s here again with new trimmings and higher resolution video.

Under development by Outrage Games and to be published by Interplay, Rubu Tribe was an ambitious proto-open world survival platformer for PlayStation 2. Control Muku and lead the rubu tribe to success as you explore the alien world, utilize the special skills of the other rubus, and direct the journey of the Utt, a gigantic creature that carries the rubus entire city on its back.

The game was right up my alley and I was super excited to get this hands-on time with an early build. You can hear me and Maxx (he’s the one filming) talking with someone from Outrage Games about the game’s features while I run around the demo area. Unfortunately the game was abandoned and Outrage went on to release Alter Echo. By way of Twitter I found out that Brad Muir (@MrMooEar) helped out on Rubu Tribe before it was canceled.

📺 About the Show 📺
It Came From The Collection -TV- is a supplemental series to my hands-on videos. These clips, commercials, and programs go live every Saturday morning to recapture the spirit of the legendary cartoon lineups and laser-focused marketing aimed at young minds. I’ve tried to clean up the picture and sound, and render them at 1080p for a more viewable presentation. ICFTC -TV- ! Part of a nutritious breakfast!

PlayStation 4: Our Once and *Former* King?

I hold to the belief that the current ruler of the console space at any given time didn’t get there by being smart, visionary, or tactful. They got there largely for one reason: the hubris of the former ruler of the console space. Nintendo dominated with the SNES and Wii but fumbled with misjudged follow-ups. Sony dominated with PlayStation 1 and 2 but overpromised on PlayStation 3 and hobbled developers with exceedingly proprietary architecture. Microsoft took the lead for the fantastic Xbox 360 era but reneged on their promise of a digital-only future, giving disgruntled gamers only one recourse: PlayStation 4.

In all these cases, the current leader did more to set themselves back than the competition did to deftly outsmart them and Sony is just the latest example. They’ve been riding that good will gale of Xbox dejecters since 2013 but their blowhard ego is very nearly ready to shred through their own sails. The signs have been on display for years: After bolstering their meager lineups with streams of indie titles, they’ve cooled immensely on promoting smaller developers. They continue to dance around the inability to change your PlayStation Network ID name. But most visibly is their continued stance against online cross-play between rival platforms.

Microsoft’s Phil Spencer has been extending the olive branch of cross-play peace for years and Nintendo’s Reggie Fils-Aime has most recently remained open to the idea. Sony, in comparison, seems dead set against it and they are quickly alienating themselves from the rest of the industry. This has all come to a head after Fortnite debuted on the Nintendo Switch this week and left players who had previously played on PlayStation 4 with inaccessible accounts.

The situation is upsetting enough but Sony’s response (thus far, at least) is worrying. The official statement is a self-aggrandizing one that prides Sony on being open to the PlayStation community’s wishes while completely ignoring the complaint. The statement delivered to the BBC reads:

“We’re always open to hearing what the PlayStation community is interested in to enhance their gaming experience. With… more than 80 million monthly active users on PlayStation Network, we’ve built a huge community of gamers who can play together on Fortnite and all online titles.

We also offer Fortnite cross-play support with PC, Mac, iOS, and Android devices, expanding the opportunity for Fortnite fans on PS4 to play with even more gamers on other platforms. We have nothing further to add beyond this at this point.”

This, I feel, is one of those moments when you can see the tide turning, the overinflated ego unable to rebalance itself after a misstep that sends it full-tilt into oncoming traffic. PlayStation 4 is strong, but growth is slowing. If cross-platform play is where Sony digs in their heels — while more online-only games release every year that support it outside of PS4 — then by the time they reluctantly concede it could be too late.

Where would the crown go from there? Microsoft has an amazing platform but they’re still suffering from the “always-on” backlash and are missing the exciting exclusives to spark a major shift to their side. The Xbox One X hardware, the Play Anywhere and Game Pass features, and Mixer integration are a great groundwork for a fantastic leader but the games and support just aren’t there. Still, if you’re pissed at Sony and want to play The Division 2, Anthem, Fallout 76, or Rise of the Tomb Raider, Xbox is your only console recourse.

That said, I think Nintendo is poised to gain the biggest boost should Sony drive the divide between its players too wide. The Switch continues to sell well and Nintendo is still riding high on the wave of “It’s coming to the Switch” announcements. They’re also using indie Nindie releases to great effect in supporting their traditionally thin lineup.

Would enough PlayStation dissidents side with Nintendo? Would that be enough to push player and publisher support for the Switch over the already beleaguered Xbox? Look, I’m terrible at predicting this stuff but I do believe a changing of the guard is coming. I just wanted to put this out there because it’s a pattern I’ve been thinking about for a while now. What do you think? If Sony royally pissed you off, where would you go?